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What books did you just buy?

Stringer

∟ v a g a b o n d
Who Goes There? — John W Campbell Jr
(The novella that formed the basis of The Thing)

I'm excited to see what differences there are between the book and its theatrical versions.
 

martryn

Dick in hand
Words of Radiance - Part 1 (Brandon Sanderson)

Second best fantasy series out there behind anything Malazan. Eagerly awaiting book 3.

America Before — by Graham Hancock

Is that his latest one? I bought his latest one for my dad's birthday. My dad loved it.

I bought the four Murakami novels I haven't read yet (Wind/Pinball, Killing Commendatore, Sputnik Sweetheart, and Dance Dance Dance) plus the last Malazan book by Esslemont (Assail).
 

Stringer

∟ v a g a b o n d
Is that his latest one? I bought his latest one for my dad's birthday. My dad loved it.
Oh that's nice, does your Dad listen to the JRE too or did you introduce him to Graham's theories?

Yeah it is, got it from audible which was fun because it's read by Hancock himself. It's interesting how most archeology figureheads are more interested to preserve the status quo than actually finding out how old the human civilization might truly be, especially with all the empirical data being presented SMH

They make it about themselves
 

martryn

Dick in hand
Oh that's nice, does your Dad listen to the JRE too or did you introduce him to Graham's theories?

No, he's read similar books on topics about civilizations that predate history, and he's always been fascinated on it. I listen to Joe Rogan, and was enthralled by the topic. I watched the one with Randall Carlson by himself, first. Watched that one twice before I started searching for more on it.

My dad actually got me into the idea a few years ago due to another book he read that he can't remember the name of which talked about evidence of an ancient seafaring peoples that predated the Egyptians that the fucking early vikings still paid tribute to by sailing down to France... or something. It was a conversation over supper one day while we out and he can't even remember the conversation now, much less the book he was referring to. The premise was that the Egyptians were actually just the remnants, a colony, of what people today might call the Atlanteans. Makes sense to me that if a massive global flood occurred and ocean levels rose, then a seafaring people with cities on the coast would have everything they worked for basically destroyed without warning.
 

Stringer

∟ v a g a b o n d
[...] which talked about evidence of an ancient seafaring peoples that predated the Egyptians that the fucking early vikings still paid tribute to by sailing down to France... or something. It was a conversation over supper one day while we out and he can't even remember the conversation now, much less the book he was referring to. The premise was that the Egyptians were actually just the remnants, a colony, of what people today might call the Atlanteans. Makes sense to me that if a massive global flood occurred and ocean levels rose, then a seafaring people with cities on the coast would have everything they worked for basically destroyed without warning.
Sounds interesting, I'll look that up

So far most ancient civilizations like Egypt, Greece (heck, all the Abrahamic religions) borrow the core of their faith, stories and core ideologies from Sumerians (they actually talk about the flood in their stories as well), so there easily might have been something that even predates Sumerians. Which is why I always found the incessant bickering/wars caused by folks trying to enforce their religious doctrines on to others incredibly stupid and trivial

It's exactly the same if a big asteroid hits Earth today, with over 90% of the population gone and we had to start from scratch -- centuries of knowledge/research done by scientists lost in an instant. People that rise from the ashes will use and bring whichever remnants of knowledge they had from the old world into the new. And like Rust Cohle says in True Detective season 1, time is a flat circle. Things repeat themselves, albeit just a little bit different each time. The notion that we just developed the brain capacity to start creating civilizations just 5000 years ago is frankly pretty ridiculous IMHO
 
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martryn

Dick in hand
That's why I want to see stronger advocacy for preserving data in stone, like they recommend. Chisel out some stone tablets that have some basic human knowledge on it, like a bit of our music, Maxwell's Laws, etc. So that if something happens again, we don't have to necessarily start completely from scratch.
 

RadSpazMids

Active Member
The Forever War by Joe Haldeman
Uprising by Micky Neilson
Liberty's Crusade by Jeff Grubb
Shadow of the Xel'Naga by Gabriel Mesta
Speed of Darkness by Tracy Hickman
 

Pilaf

The Man in the Rain
"Splinter of the Mind's Eye" by Alan Dean Foster

Remember borrowing it from the library when I was a kid in the early nineties. It's an example of early Star Wars EU. Very early. It was written between the release of Star Wars and Empire Strikes Back, so some of the lore and characters seem weird compared to what we find out later, but I'm building my Legends library and want to own it all, so I'll give this one another read and enjoy it for what it is.
 

Bielec

Well-Known Member
1984, I was in a mall, and wanted to just buy random book that will catch my eye. Heard a lot about it over time, and I worried that I would end up dissapointed, but I've read more than a half, and so far so good.
 

Galo de Lion

Burning Firefighting Soul
Words of Radiance: Part 2 (Brandon Sanderson), Tower of Fools (Andrzej Sapowski) & The Left-Handed Booksellers of London (Garth Nix)
 

martryn

Dick in hand
Words of Radiance: Part 2 (Brandon Sanderson)

Oh, man, the 4th book of that series is on my list of books to buy, but I feel like I need a recap of the series so far because it's been 3 years since I read the 3rd book. Course, I mentioned that the last time you bought one of his books in this thread.

I've purchased a slew of books recently, but all on programming and algorithms.
Learning Algorithms through Programming and Puzzle Solving by Alexander Kulikov and Pavel Pevzner
Grokking Algorithms by Aditya Y. Bhargava
Grokking Deep Learning by Andrew W. Trask
Code by Charles Petzold
Thinking in Java by Bruce Eckel
Java: Concurrency in Practice by Brian Goetz

AND

I bought a book on Latin so I can refresh what I learned in high school. The obvious choice was
Latin via Ovid by Norma Goldman and Jacob E. Nyenhuis
 

only

the one and only
I just bought "How to read a book" by Mortimer J. Adler. Seems engaging and interesting so far.
 

martryn

Dick in hand
I just bought "How to read a book" by Mortimer J. Adler. Seems engaging and interesting so far.

Oh, shit, the Aristotle for Everyone guy? He's a great author. I read him in Jr. High. I don't know him beyond that, but if you like that one, you should check out his Aristotle for Everyone book, cause I can highly recommend that one.
 

only

the one and only
Oh, shit, the Aristotle for Everyone guy? He's a great author. I read him in Jr. High. I don't know him beyond that, but if you like that one, you should check out his Aristotle for Everyone book, cause I can highly recommend that one.
Thank you. I'll check it out soon. 😊
 

Stringer

∟ v a g a b o n d
The Age of Persuasion — by Terry O'Reilly & Mike Tennant
(Audible version)

Never Split the Difference — by Chris Voss


homework, homework, homework
 
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