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Tokyo 2020 (2021) Olympics countdown

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
More than 30 per cent of Japanese residents want next year’s postponed Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympic Games to be cancelled, according to a poll by broadcaster NHK.

The news comes as Japan struggles once more with the coronavirus pandemic.

Faced with a record number of cases, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga suspended a discounted domestic travel campaign on Monday, with rival lawmakers blaming the “Go To” programme for the rise in cases across the country since it was launched in October.

Officials this month announced a new set of guidelines for the country’s 510 host towns, with NHK reporting concerns at rising costs.

Elsewhere, Games organisers on Wednesday announced the planned scaling back of public viewing for events in Tokyo.

Some 1,200 Japanese were polled by NHK over the weekend by telephone and asked whether they think the Games should go ahead next year. The results of the survey were released on Tuesday.

“Twenty-seven per cent said the Games should be staged, 32 per cent said they should be cancelled, and 31 per cent said they should be postponed further,” NHK said.

NHK had conducted a similar poll in October, with 40 per cent of respondents saying that Tokyo 2020 should go ahead next year. Only 23 per cent said they should be cancelled, while 25 per cent opted for postponing them further.

“I will continue to spare no effort to bring about the Games that are safe and secure,” Suga said this month but the public appear unconvinced. The Games are set to start on July 23, 2021.

 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Japan’s government is planning to stop overseas spectators coming to the Summer Olympics due to worries they will spread the coronavirus, a report said on Wednesday, as many Japanese remain opposed to holding the Games during the pandemic.

The final decision would be made this month after talks with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and other parties, the Mainichi newspaper reported, citing multiple unnamed sources.

The government would continue to consider whether to accept spectators from within Japan, including the number allowed into venues, the Mainichi added.

The report came as the local organising committee was set to host a meeting on Wednesday with officials from the IOC, the International Paralympic Committee, and the Tokyo and national governments.

The question of whether to allow spectators into venues was top of the agenda and organisers have previously said they would make a decision by March.

A Yomiuri newspaper poll showed on Wednesday that, if the Games are to go ahead as scheduled, 91% of people in Japan want spectators kept to a minimum or not allowed at all.

The poll - conducted between Jan. 18 and Feb. 25 - showed 70% of respondents said they were “interested in the Olympics”, but 58% said they did not want them to be held this year because of fears over COVID-19.

The 58% in opposition was, however, about 20 percentage points lower than earlier opinion polls.

DELAYED GAMES

The Tokyo Olympic Games were postponed last year because of the pandemic and rescheduled to take place this year from July 23.

A survey by global consultancy Kekst CNC published on Wednesday showed similar rates of majority opposition to the Games going ahead in Japan, at 56%, as well as in Britain and Germany, at 55% and 52% respectively.

In France and Sweden, more people opposed than approved, while in the United States, respondents were split at one-third between those who agreed and disagreed that the Games should go ahead, according to the survey.

While coronavirus infection numbers are low in Japan compared with the United States and many European countries, the greater Tokyo metropolitan area remains in a state of emergency, with restrictions in place for spectator numbers for big sporting and cultural events, as well as closing times for bars and restaurants. The country remains closed to non-resident foreigners.

A Reuters poll published last month showed nearly two-thirds of Japanese companies also oppose holding the Games as planned, swinging from the previous survey showing most in favour.

Japan has so far confirmed 431,250 coronavirus cases and 7,931 deaths as of Monday.

 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
The Japanese government has decided to exclude overseas spectators from attending this summer's Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, as part of efforts to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, officials with knowledge of the matter said Tuesday.

The government and the Japanese organizing committee of the Summer Games are expected to hold a remote meeting with the International Olympic Committee and two other bodies possibly next week to make a formal decision on the issue of overseas visitors.

The government has concluded that welcoming fans from abroad is not possible given concerns among the Japanese public over the coronavirus and the fact that more contagious variants have been detected in many countries, according to the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Japan continues to halt new entries of foreign nationals in principle as it is taking more time than initially expected for the government to stem the number of infections since early January, when it peaked at more than 2,500 cases per day in Tokyo.

With the decision, the government will also have to review its growth strategy, given that expectations for inbound visitors to revive the Japanese economy were high, especially before the games were delayed for one year due to the outbreak of the virus.

On March 3, the representatives of the five organizing bodies, which also include the International Paralympic Committee and the Tokyo metropolitan government, agreed to make a decision on overseas spectators by the end of this month.

They will then make a call in April on the number of spectators to be allowed into venues based on Japanese restrictions on attendance at large events.

While the one-year postponement of the games has caused the cost to balloon to at least 1.64 trillion yen ($15 billion), the organizing committee was expecting to make 90 billion yen from ticket sales.

The committee now needs to proceed with refunding foreign ticket holders and it is expected to separately consider what to do with foreign spectators to be invited by corporate sponsors of the games.

It has not publicly disclosed the total number of tickets to be sold, but some officials have said it was likely to be over 9 million before the games were rescheduled one year ago.

While about 1 million overseas spectators were estimated to enter Japan, some 4.45 million tickets have already been sold in the country, of which about 810,000 requests for refund have been made so far.

In December, a government-led panel tasked with coming up with COVID-19 measures for the Olympics said in an interim report that overseas spectators could use public transport and be exempt from a 14-day quarantine requirement if they were from countries with relatively few virus cases.

However, the Japanese organizers studied several options in parallel, such as holding the games behind closed doors and staging them with a limited number of spectators just from Japan.

"We would really like people from around the world to come to a full stadium, but unless we are prepared to accept them and the medical situation in Japan is perfect, it will cause a great deal of trouble also to visitors from overseas," Seiko Hashimoto, president of the Japanese committee, told reporters last week.

Hashimoto has sought to finalize whether to let visitors from abroad watch the games live in the stands at each venue before the domestic leg of the Olympic torch relay begins on March 25.

The opening ceremony of the relay will be held without spectators as well to prevent the spread of the virus, officials with knowledge of the planning also said Tuesday.

The organizing committee has decided it is essential to hold the ceremony in the northeastern prefecture of Fukushima behind closed doors, only permitting participants and invitees to take part in the event, to avoid large crowds forming amid the pandemic, the officials said.

After the ceremony at the J-Village soccer training center, about 10,000 runners will carry the flame through Japan's 47 prefectures before the opening of the Olympics on July 23.

The training center served as a frontline base in the battle against the nuclear crisis that was triggered by the massive earthquake and ensuing tsunami of March 11, 2011. It was selected as the starting point of the relay to showcase the northeastern region's recovery from the triple disaster.

Last month, the committee released a set of coronavirus countermeasures for the 121-day relay that requested those who wish to watch the event to refrain from traveling to other prefectures and to maintain social distancing from other spectators.

In recent weeks, a number of celebrity torchbearers, who were expected to draw large crowds along the route, have opted out of the event, which was supposed to have been held last year before the Olympics and Paralympics were due to the global health crisis.

The Olympics are due to take place between July 23 and Aug. 8, followed by the Paralympics from Aug. 24 to Sept. 5.



:catflip
 

Dark Shadow

Prince of Darkness
I might get hate comment for saying this but Olympics needs to be abolished and give importance to World championships .

The idea behind Olympics is to bring culture exchange and sport philosophy however with rise in cheating and doping scandals the essence of sportsmanship is lost tbh.


Especially Cycling was major hit with dope scandal , Amateur boxing , wrestling have come under scanner rise in doping cases.

Either disband olympics and host something like league conference every year best of athletes will compete in world series .
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Tokyo is saying they will refund those 600,000 foreigners who had already bought tickets for the Olympics, as well as those 300,000 who had bought tickets for the Paralympics. In all close to a million tickets.

If we assume that a ticket costs between $50 and $100 US dollars (depending on demand for that sport), you're looking at between $50 million and $100 million in refunds. Ouch.
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
North Korea will not join the Tokyo Olympics this year due to coronavirus concerns, the country’s sports ministry said on Tuesday, dashing South Korean hopes the Games could be a catalyst to revive stalled peace talks.

It will be the first time North Korea has missed a Summer Olympics since it boycotted Seoul in 1988 amid the Cold War.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in had hoped the two countries, still technically at war after their 1950-53 conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty, could field a combined team in Tokyo and rebuild momentum for improved relations.

The North’s withdrawal from Tokyo is also a setback for plans, agreed at a 2018 summit between Moon and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, to pursue a joint Korean bid to host the 2032 Games.

When South Korea hosted the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in 2018, Kim sent his sister to head the country’s delegation, athletes from both sides marched under a unified flag at the opening ceremony, and fielded a combined women’s ice hockey team.

Tensions on the Korean Peninsula rose last month when the North resumed missile tests, although both sides said after the launches that they wanted to continue dialogue.

South Korea’s Unification Ministry in charge of inter-Korean affairs said Seoul had hoped the Tokyo Olympics would be a chance to “foster peace and reconciliation between the two Koreas”.

“We regret it could not happen,” it added in a statement.

Tokyo Olympic organisers said they were aware of news reports on North Korea’s move and would work with other countries for the success of the Games.

“We will continue to prepare the best possible stage to welcome athletes from all countries and regions,” the organising committee said in a statement.

The North made its decision to pull out of Tokyo at a meeting of its Olympic committee and Sports Minister Kim Il Guk on March 25, the ministry said on its website.

“The committee decided not to join the 32nd Olympics Games to protect athletes from the global health crisis caused by the coronavirus,” it said.

North Korea says it has not had any coronavirus cases.

Kim, known to be a fan of U.S. basketball, has publicly displayed his ambitions to promote professional sports.

The March 25 meeting also discussed ways to develop professional sports technologies, earn more medals at international competitions and expand public sports activities over the next five years, the ministry said.

 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Funny that with like a month to go the Tokyo thread is stone dead. Only necroed to talk about something that's happening in 11 years.
 

Rukia

VIP
Is this one even going to go forward? I will believe it when I see it. Also, it’s out of cycle and tbh greatly diminished by the covid cloud.
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Is this one even going to go forward? I will believe it when I see it. Also, it’s out of cycle and tbh greatly diminished by the covid cloud.

Actually, it's the first modern Olympics to be "in cycle". :edu

The Ancient Greek Olympics were held in BC years ending in -0, -6, -2, -8, and -4. When the creators of the Modern Olympics set about reviving them, they seem to have assumed that the Olympiad of 4 BC was followed by the one of 0 AD and then the one of 4 AD. Which is why we had an Olympiad in 2000 AD and 2004 AD.

But actually, there is no "0 AD" in the Anno Domini calendar. It goes directly from 1 BC to 1 AD. So the Olympiad of 4 BC would have been followed by the one of 1 AD and then the one of 5 AD. Then years ending in -9, -3, and -7.

Tokyo 2020 is the first modern Olympiad to be held in the correct year if extrapolating from the Ancient Greek version.
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Future Olympics look like they're gonna be:

Tokyo 2020 (Summer)
Beijing 2022 (Winter)
Paris 2024 (Summer)
Milan 2026 (Winter)
Los Angeles 2028 (Summer)
TBD 2030 (Winter)
Brisbane 2032 (Summer) [probably]
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Future Olympics look like they're gonna be:

Tokyo 2020 (Summer)
Beijing 2022 (Winter)
Paris 2024 (Summer)
Milan 2026 (Winter)
Los Angeles 2028 (Summer)
TBD 2030 (Winter)
Brisbane 2032 (Summer) [probably]

I don’t like the 2030 options. I would probably go with Vancouver out of the current bidders.

You can kind of see a continental pattern from the ones we know so far. Tokyo and Beijing are both in Asia, and Paris and Milan both in Europe. They might continue this rhythm and pair Los Angeles with a winter event that is also in the Americas, i.e. either Vancouver or Salt Lake City, out of the ones announced so far.

The "Pyrenees" bid could be a bit fun, since it gives the microstate Andorra the opportunity to (co-)host the Olympics. Generally I think microstates have neither the budget nor the space to shoulder the Games on their own, so they can only get in on the action by partnering with a larger neighbor.
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Here's a map of past Olympic hosts.



Would be kind of fun to have the Winter Games in Mongolia at some point. It's sufficiently far north (I've been to Chinese Inner Mongolia, and trust me, it gets cold), and unlike its neighbors China and Russia it's also a democracy (84% ""), so you wouldn't get any of the boycott controversies.
 

dr_shadow

Trust me, I'm a doctor
Moderator
Tokyo marked one month until the opening of the Olympics on Wednesday, with organizers entering the final phase of preparations to improve safety measures and perfect logistical operations after more than a year of difficulties posed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Athletes started to arrive in Japan this month to hold training camps, but the organizers of the Olympics and Paralympics continue to struggle to turn Japanese people in favor of staging the sporting extravaganza amid a global health crisis.

The organizers have given the public and participants a better idea of what the Olympics will be like following an unprecedented postponement, having set significant limits on spectator attendance.

They finally decided on what to do with local fans on Monday, saying venues can fill to 50 percent of capacity, up to a maximum of 10,000 spectators, and left open the possibility of hosting the games behind closed doors if the infection situation worsens.

The decision was made just after a COVID-19 state of emergency ended in Tokyo and some other parts of the country.

Still, medical experts warn of a possible resurgence of the virus before or after the Olympics begin July 23. A recent Kyodo News survey also found that about 86 percent of people in Japan are concerned about the risk of a rebound in COVID-19 cases.

After barring overseas spectators in March, Seiko Hashimoto, president of the organizing committee, has said the decision on limits for domestic spectators is the "final piece" of the most complicated part of its preparations, before a fresh lottery for ticker holders to determine who can watch in person.

Since the postponement of the Olympics and Paralympics last year, the organizers have faced a number of challenges from securing venues, reviewing costs, formulating anti-virus measures and explaining to the public that the games can be held safely.

Japanese and Australian softball teams will raise the curtain on competitions on July 21 in the northeastern prefecture of Fukushima before the official opening of the Olympics. The athletes' village will formally open on July 13.

Featuring some 11,000 athletes from around the world, 33 sports will be staged during the games that close on Aug. 8. In order to prevent the spread of the virus, athletes will be kept in a "bubble" environment and will not be allowed to interact with locals or visit places outside of their venues or accommodation.

The International Olympic Committee has set the deadlines for the qualification period next Tuesday and the athletes' registration period on July 5.

The Tokyo leg of the torch relay is set to begin on July 9. While about 10,000 runners were initially set to carry the Olympic flame in the country's 47 prefectures, the organizing committee has scaled down or taken the event off public roads in many areas, including Hokkaido, Osaka and Fukuoka.

 

Nemesis

Cafe Queen
Moderator
Ok two things, since the olympics are a big event. I will be pinning this thread.

Also in a serious note. Any talk relating to Laurel Hubbard being transgender will not be tolerated in the slightest in here or anywhere in the sports bar as the topic is highly sensitive.
 
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