Megathread The Russo-Ukrainian War

Nemesis

Queen of Stoicism
Moderator

Any better sources for this. I know it's Putin and all but The Express lies just as much as your average Russian diplomat.
 

Overwatch

[Yogurt intensifies]

Where would the Free World be without this dingleberry? It must really twist his nipples that he can’t just attack Greece without repercussions.

If nothing else, I sincerely hope the powers that be finally get the message about being too dependent on complete twats when this whole thing ends.
 

Jim

Normal Person
Russia really should have just highlighted racism towards minorities in ukraine long before he invaded. Although, it would have required Putin to care about non russian minoirities.
 

Aegon Targaryen

King of the Andals, the Rhoynar, and the First Men
Russia really should have just highlighted racism towards minorities in ukraine long before he invaded. Although, it would have required Putin to care about non russian minoirities.

To be fair, Putin did try, lol. He and others fearmongered about Nazis (who, to my knowledge, are a tiny and politically insignificant group) and "genocide" in Ukraine.


 

Ruthless Tsuchikage

Well-Known Member
Its really strange Russia is so angry at NATO helping Ukraine. What else is NATO supposed to do when Russia tries to destroy Ukraine and torture, rape and murder its citizens for the lulz? There's no casus beli for Putin's war, no justification for his aggression and Russia has already made it clear that they plan to ethnically cleanse Ukraine. So when faced with that injustice why shouldn't the world help Ukraine?
 

Mider T

Apples and Bananers




 

Jim

Normal Person
To be fair, Putin did try, lol. He and others fearmongered about Nazis (who, to my knowledge, are a tiny and politically insignificant group) and "genocide" in Ukraine.
Lol, but like he only mentioned anti Russian Nazis, not like, they're mistreating blacks and stuff
 

RavenSupreme

Well-Known Member
Ukraine said their counteroffensive on the south of Kharkiv is going so well that they plan to completely liberate the area back to the russian border by tomorrow. Hot take honestly.

They admit that their counteroffensive on the south-east of Kharkiv is now stopped, as they do not have enough supply of drones for reconnaissance, ammunition and howitzers. In addition russian forces in that area are fiercely resisting - which is to be expected, as if the russians lose that area as well fully, the ukrainians could just move right and walk to the area near izyum.
 
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Ultrafragor

Well-Known Member
Well, the Republicans are on Putin's side, which has been obvious from the beginning. Russia could nuke a NATO ally, and blindly follow him still they would without a fucking doubt.

Is it following or just genuine agreement?

The overall make-up of loud and aggressive politicians fanning social unrest to push objectives that violate human rights/freedoms can describe Russia and the US government.

In both cases, the majority of people don't agree with the government, but are along for the ride while under threat from the army of assholes that worship corrupt leaders.

The level of violence isn't the same, but it's kind of obvious that some US politicians would be sympathetic and supportive of Putin and Russia, even besides the financial links.
 

stream

Do something, Naruto!
I wonder if they'll make a video game about this.
Not likely. I don't remember games about the Iraq invasion, or Afghanistan, or the Syria war. At the most, they would do games that happen side by side to the war, or in a country that look suspiciously similar with a different name.
 

Kroczilla

Well-Known Member

Basically commentary on the now infamous failed pontoon bridge crossing attempt. Seems like the casualty numbers might have been even more devastating than we thought. This dude for example (apparently a former high ranking DNR official) states that his initially casualty numbers off by about 2 to 3 times.

Heard unconfirmed reports that the actual figure is well over 1000 including several senior military officers.
 

Gianfi

Well-Known Member
Not likely. I don't remember games about the Iraq invasion, or Afghanistan, or the Syria war. At the most, they would do games that happen side by side to the war, or in a country that look suspiciously similar with a different name.
There are games about iraq invasion. And while i don't remember games about the afghanistan invasion, there are videogames sei in afghanistan after the arrival of western forces there.

Tbh, knowing how much arrogant the americans are, in the future they'll make a game where you impersonate an american soldier fending off russian forces in Ukraine, even though no american shot a bullet in the war
 

WorkingMoogle

Well-Known Member

Pubehead pissant
He's right, we should have someone overseeing how the funds are spent.

Thank him for volunteering and ship him off to Ukraine, he's welcome to return when the fighting is over.

If he has a sudden change of heart about the amount of support needed we can take that under advisement.
 

Wolfarus

Mrgrgr
He's right, we should have someone overseeing how the funds are spent.

Thank him for volunteering and ship him off to Ukraine, he's welcome to return when the fighting is over.

If he has a sudden change of heart about the amount of support needed we can take that under advisement.
I'm slightly in agreement w/ this sort of thing. While it may sound a bit callous, the R-U war is far more a EU concern then an American one. The US has a metric shit-ton of problems that need to be focused on here at home. Problems that require finite resources to try and fix. Constantly spending $ on other countries, regardless of what the $ is being used for, is not good for us in the long run. (Given the sheer #/scope of issues here)

We've given Ukraine plenty of help for the time being. Time for the EU to really step up and take care (or at least try) of the problem in their own backyard.
 

Island

In the Sun
Moderator
I wonder if they'll make a video game about this.
Not likely.

Developers don't like making games based on modern or recent conflicts. Games set in the modern world almost always place in alternate realities with different leaders, parties, etc.

Call of Duty, for example, often uses fictional nations, political factions, and terrorist groups as the bad guys. It purposefully steers clear of real people, groups, conflicts, and ideologies.
 

SuperSaiyaMan12

The Seventh Hokage's arrived.
Not likely.

Developers don't like making games based on modern or recent conflicts. Games set in the modern world almost always place in alternate realities with different leaders, parties, etc.

Call of Duty, for example, often uses fictional nations, political factions, and terrorist groups as the bad guys. It purposefully steers clear of real people, groups, conflicts, and ideologies.
The closest attempt was done with Command and Conquer Generals, but even then it was heavily fictionalized...though it did end up eerily predicting the start of the 2020's.
 

Garcher

Well-Known Member
Not likely.

Developers don't like making games based on modern or recent conflicts. Games set in the modern world almost always place in alternate realities with different leaders, parties, etc.

Call of Duty, for example, often uses fictional nations, political factions, and terrorist groups as the bad guys. It purposefully steers clear of real people, groups, conflicts, and ideologies.
in Realpolitiks (a rather obscure grand strategy game set in 2020) the Russian goal in the main scenario is "to restore the Soviet Union" iirc. Interestingly the game has a Russian publisher.
 

RavenSupreme

Well-Known Member
With the information that the Russian-occupied territories of Georgia now of all times want to hold a referendum to join the russian federation we have the clearest indication as to how this war is meant to be played out for Putin in the long run to prevent a clear loss:

- Annex Kherson Oblast (done)
- Annex Luhansk Oblast (almost done)
- Annex Donezsk Oblast (still a ways to go)

-> Hold referendum of Independence (incoming in Kherson, semi-done in Luhansk and Doneszk)

-> Hold second referendum to join the Russian Federation

-> Refer to your nuclear doctrine of using nuclear attacks to an agressor who threatens the security of territory of the russian federation

This way Ukraine would be in principle attack russia, warranting russia to use nuclear weapons in line with their doctrine - pressuring Ukraine and its allies to either test the resolve to use them or back down, ceding the territories to russia.
 

dr_shadow

Moderator
Moderator
I wonder if they'll make a video game about this.

Not likely. I don't remember games about the Iraq invasion, or Afghanistan, or the Syria war. At the most, they would do games that happen side by side to the war, or in a country that look suspiciously similar with a different name.

There are games about iraq invasion. And while i don't remember games about the afghanistan invasion, there are videogames sei in afghanistan after the arrival of western forces there.

Tbh, knowing how much arrogant the americans are, in the future they'll make a game where you impersonate an american soldier fending off russian forces in Ukraine, even though no american shot a bullet in the war

Not likely.

Developers don't like making games based on modern or recent conflicts. Games set in the modern world almost always place in alternate realities with different leaders, parties, etc.

Call of Duty, for example, often uses fictional nations, political factions, and terrorist groups as the bad guys. It purposefully steers clear of real people, groups, conflicts, and ideologies.

The closest attempt was done with Command and Conquer Generals, but even then it was heavily fictionalized...though it did end up eerily predicting the start of the 2020's.

in Realpolitiks (a rather obscure grand strategy game set in 2020) the Russian goal in the main scenario is "to restore the Soviet Union" iirc. Interestingly the game has a Russian publisher.

Two factors that probably play in would be:

1. The more living veterans there are from the war in question, the more likely it is you'll be sued by somebody who feels you've misrepresented them. It's safest to stick to wars where most combatants are safely dead and can't complain.

2. Details about recent wars may in fact be classified by the militaries involved, which makes it hard to reconstruct all troop movements and battles. In the United States, most classified documents are automatically declassified after 25 years unless actively given an exception. Meaning that the earliest Pentagon documents generated by the Afghan War would become declassified in 2026, and the last ones in 2046. The details of the Bin Laden assassination would be released in 2036.

Then we'll have to see if the Taliban simultaneously declassify their documents so we can know what was happening in the opposing camp. I wouldn't bet on much transparancy from them.

The most recent US war for which most documents are publicly available would be the Gulf War of 1991, which was declassified in 2016. The general "declassification horizon" is currently at 1997, if you want to know what was going on in Clinton's head during the Yugoslav Wars of Europe.
 
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RavenSupreme

Well-Known Member
The german army has - as well as the austrian army - published several videos about the conflict where they paint very clear, easy to understand and most of all military neutral asessments of the situations on the ground. One of the most interesting things I learned from these videos are the different doctrines which are apparently being used, and which likely explain some moves and decisions which have been made by both ukrainian and russian forces. They are called "Auftragstatik" and "Befehlstaktik".

Under "Auftragstaktik" or plainly: "task-tactic", the soldiers and on-the-ground officers are being given a specific task they have to do but get "Beinfreiheit"/"wiggle room" in how they think to achieve it.

Whereas under "Befehlstaktik" "order-tactic", the soldiers gets zero leeway and more or less just told where and when to move. The repeated attempts of russians for example trying to resupply an airport which got memed on in social media when their soldiers got defeated for the 7,8,9th...time trying the same is not due to incompetence of the soldiers on the ground but due to them having been given no choice but to follow this strict order under "Befehlstaktik".

The reason why this form of tactic was used and had to be carried out by the grunts at the front stemmed from the misinformation the highest generals in the kremlin wanted to present to putin.

Now in the battle of Donbass, russia is slightly readjusting from "Befehlstaktik" to "Auftragstaktik" - which is also the reason why such meme-worthy losses have become very rare. This is good for Russia but at the same time also makes actual heavy losses (like the bridge disaster) much more worth, as this means the Ukrainians are actively suceeding in combat instead of just exploiting a non-fitting battle doctrin.
 
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