Let's just get into the nitty gritty.

The following excerpts are from Michael Moorcock's various posts in his own forum, answering fan questions about his works.

Alright. Admittedly, Michael Moorcock did say his multiverse is infinite twice. The reason I bring them up? I'll explain in a bit.

https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...eternal-champion-the-peoples-choice#post22387

Whoops. A time loop, no doubt. Interesting. Generally most people's favourite character in my stuff IS the one they read first, at least as far as the fantasy is concerned. Some people read the fantasy first and then came to like the non-fantasy, such as Mother London, better and probably a few even read Mother London first and then went to look at the fantasy. I'm always interested to read peoples' accounts of how they came to my books, though, as Red Arrow says, it's not a debate I can make much of a useful contribution to. My favourite of my fantasy characters is Elric, but I think my favourites of my non-fantasy characters have to be Mrs Cornelius and Joseph Kiss. Given that they once lived so close, it's a shame they never got to meet!
The reason for offering different demises for characters is to indicate that I am only selecting one strand from one manifestation of the EC.
There are many others, where Elric had a dull, uneventful life and died of old age, for instance, or where Corum didn't die at the end of the second sequence, but died violently in some other alternative of his world.
The multiverse is infinite. The stories in it are infinite. Occasionally those stories intersect. What can I say ? I have a complicated brain.


-Michael Moorcock

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https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...he-victims-of-elrics-sword-stormbringer/page3

While the Eternal Champion is, indeed, the servant of the Balance, which is why he fights sometimes for Law, sometimes for Chaos, it is possible for two of his incarnations to exist on the same plane. There's some suggestion, I'd say, that Gaynor the Damned was once a Knight of the Balance and possibly an incarnation of the Eternal Champion. Perhaps he's the Champion who refused his destiny ? The multiverse, as explained in MM's Multiverse graphic novel, consists of an infinite number of variations of the same universe -- each divided by infinitely tiny differences -- only at some distance apart are the worlds radically different. Champions can move across these worlds by a variety of means, usually in service of the Balance, which, it's fair to say, is probably the only constant throughout the multiverse.

-Michael Moorcock

Okay, now people might be asking "Why are you shooting your own argument in the foot?" The answer: I'm not. These two posts were dated back in 2004, one in January and one in March. Every single post of his detailing his multiverse after March 2004 has him saying that it's quasi-infinite, and he's been extremely consistent about that distinction.

In fact, Moorcock contradicted his "the multiverse is infinite" comment just a few months later, in September 2004: https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...iboné-archive/1394-elric-and-dreams#post46507


Imagine an apparent infinity of different instruments, every one of which has to be in tune with itself and with the others. That's the number of slightly variant stories which have to happen to produce a change of the kind described in, say, Stormbringer, if that change is to be reflected throughout the multiverse. The events in both the MMM story, the forthcoming Elric graphic story and the final novel all reflect the same ending. But every story is slightly or even radically different.
I'll be interested to hear if you think it works. The beginnings of the story are closer to being the same but diverge. The trick is to bring them all back to the same effective place at the end and that's what the Knights of the Balance work to achieve, fighting sometimes for Law, sometimes for Chaos. The Balance is, if you like, the stuff of life. Without it, neither side can have coherence. The struggle itself creates life, sentience and therefore Time. And therefore Space, which is a quality of Time. But what if the object were not to 'win' -- Chaos over Law or Law over Chaos -- but to control the Balance itself ? And by controlling it to stop Time and therefore abolish Space and thus obliterate existence ?


-Michael Moorcock

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Every post from here-on will be posted in chronological order of when Michael Moorcock made these posts.

August 2008: https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...ere-any-enigmas-in-your-multiverse#post206191

There are enigmas, paradoxes and quite a few mysteries, naturally. I think it's likely we'll find our fair share as we explore the quasi-infinite!

-Michael Moorcock

July 2009 (this one doubles as him explaining another influence on his universe as well as his experiences as a writer): https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...ichael-moorcock-s-multiverse/page2#post254975

I think the simple answer to the question is 'everything'. For almost as long as I can remember I had wanted to write about London as a 'multiverse', blending reality and myth, hopes, dreams, memories. I made an awkward attempt at showing this in the London novel I wrote in the 50s which was set mostly in Soho and which I lost, I think when I went to Sweden. Growing up, for me London was also a malleable city, forever changing. You can get much of this in the piece I wrote for The Financial Times, published just before the BL event. I think one of the reasons I'm so unhappy living inthe country near a small (but very lively) provincial city is that I miss the sense of infinity I get from a city of considerable size, London in particular. London expands forever. There are no real limits to a city of that size. London is full of of narratives. It has as many stories as the multiverse. I think Paris works for me,, too. It's not just a question of physical size it's also of depth in time. New York can work like that for me, too. I'm sure if I'd lived in NY, I'd feel the same and be writing stories out of the city. Maybe New Orleans, too. All these cities have inspired me, but not as much as London. So, yes, London is the multiverse, packed with narratives, quasi-infinite, constantly inspiring.
To be honest, most of what I feel about London as a sentient creature is offered in Mother London, King of the City, London Bone, the Cornelius and the Pyat stories. Probably The Deep Fix is the first published story I wrote which expressed my feelings about London as a living thing. Also The Real Life Mr Newman, which was written around the same time, but messed up somewhat by the copy editor! I felt some of this about LA, too, as mentioned in Letters from Hollywood. Without wishing to knock Ackroyd in any way, I think Sinclair and I were expressing these ideas for a long time before Peter began writing about London in a similar way... We used to meet frequently (see references and dedications in the Blood books for instance) before I left for America and for some time afterwards and you'll find a certain amount of cross fertilisation around that time (about 10 years ago) but Peter, for reasons never explained, moved away from Iain and me, maybe because the two of us remained interested in the less respectable aspects of old and new London, I don't know. I'm not as interested in nostalgia as Peter or, indeed, Suggs (Madness's Norton Folgate) or even the Ray Davies choral versions of Kinks (mostly) London songs, which I think have as much to do with fashion as imagination. This isn't to knock either Madness or Ray Davies, whom I enjoy, but there's a distinct sense of xeroxing going on at the moment. I still prefer Ian Dury for popular London ditties.


-Michael Moorcock

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March 2010: https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...he-multiverse-the-multiverse/page4#post285620

Even when writing about the multiverse I've been careful to call it the quasi infinite. Of course my speculations about super-dense and super-gaseous bodies fit nicely into the Dark Matter stuff as well as what I'm calling the Dark Tide, though I think a better term is needed, since 'Dark Force' and all that gets it mixed up with horror stories, Star Wars and so on. Lightless Sea ? Shades of Xanadu...
Antimatter ? Anything which incorporates that ?


-Michael Moorcock

May 2010 (This is a long post so I'll just take the necessary part out; feel free to read it by clicking on the link. Also, this is just Moorcock's draft of the whole piece because he himself said that he can't post the entire piece from the Financial Times due to copyright.): https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...-moorcock-financial-times?p=293076#post293076

Although I’m often referred to as a science fiction writer, I’ve written comparatively few SF novels, most of them in the 1960s when I was lucky enough to think of a few ideas which turned out to be fairly accurate. In 1961 I came up with the “multiverse” – the notion of a near-infinite number of parallel universes nesting inside the other – and also predicted what we now call black holes and miniaturised computers (this was in the days when computers took up whole buildings and, logically, a better one was always a bigger one) but they weren’t based on any profound knowledge of astrophysics. If anything the ideas had more in common with metaphysics. Still, I’m proud of my predictions. Whether I’ll be so lucky with this new story remains to be seen.


-Michael Moorcock

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August 2012: https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-a/q-a-◦-questions-for-mike-news/16425-multiverse/page2#post355099

In 1961 I suspect my response was similiar to others who didn't like the idea of the Big Bang logically ending in maximum Entropy. (I also had a sort of black hole in the story, dragging everything back in!) A philosophical/metaphysical response rather than a scientific one, but I'm pretty convinced this is the general temperamental response of people like me (who want a multiverse crammed with diverse phenomena).
Temperamentally I really wanted the Multiverse. This was a development of the 5th dimension idea, but that wasn't enough for me. SF writers had played with the idea of 'alternate space-time continua' and used it to great effect in both sf and fantasy fiction (I liked the Harold Shea stories as a kid, for instance) but I don't believe there was an actual 'multiverse' described -- that is a vision of a complex multitude of worlds existing outside our familiar notion of s-t with 'orbits' and predictable courses through which a 'rogue' system might progress in an irregular path. So while this was theoretical physics (or metaphysics, if you prefer) it was either applied to fantasy stories or science fiction. That idea was to do with the 'branching off' notions of quantum physics. I wasn't describing that theory. I was describing 'nests' of alternatives ('quasi-infinite').
For about twenty years or so I've liked the idea of similar universes co-existing at greater or lesser mass -- invisible to us because they are either much larger or much smaller. I continue to call these 'planes' (as in most of the fantasy stories) because it creates less confusion when moving from a fantasy to a science fiction to a non-genre story. As far as I know no other writer has tried to produce 'charts' to accompany theories of a multiverse. Most people seem still to be grappling with linear notions of time and space rather than what I called 'intratemporal' notions in which everything exists at the same moment. In the past I've found that if you put an idea out there some genius eventually produces the math.


-Michael Moorcock

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His latest one, January 2015 (he hasn't posted in the site since 2015 due to his age): https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-...existence-of-the-multiverse/page11#post389879

Paradox is the norm. We have to stop trying to rationalise everything from too little data. That said, I still like my model which has a near infinite sequence of nesting universes too big or too little for us to detect each varying infinitesimally from the other. A bit like Mandelbrot sets. Obeying similar laws which only vary marginally over vast areas. Then there's Radiant Time, of course...



-Michael Moorcock